Gutenberg Workshop in the Life Sciences: Stem cell systems in development, disease and regeneration

September 7th-9th, 2022, Mainz

Stem cells are the driving force behind many crucial aspects of multi-cellular life. As such, they also have an immense impact on human health. Understanding the biology of stem cells is therefore of utmost importance to treat disease. Stem cells also hold the promise to improve regeneration, for instance to re-establish neuronal function following severe damage, to shed light on how we develop from a fertilized oocyte into a mature individual, but also to learn what happens in cancer when stem cells turn awry. Finally, we live in an ageing society, and also on this front stem cell biology holds the potential to help people age in a healthy manner. The last decade has seen immense developments in this field of research. For instance, new 3D- culture systems called organoids permit the study of the early development of human tissues and organs in health and disease and innovative technologies allow for unveiling stem cell dynamics at single cell level as never before. This workshop will bring together many leaders of the stem cell field, covering different areas and approaches. Our aim is to provide a personal and informal setting in order to discuss the latest insights and discoveries and to inspire everyone who attends with novel ideas.

 

Scientific Organizer: Prof. Dr. René Ketting, Prof. Dr. Benedikt Berninger, Dr. Natalia Soshnikova

Scientific Advisor: Prof. Dr. Peter Baumann

Event Manager: Nina Heydt

 

Invited Speakers:

Jürgen Knoblich* IMBA, Austria
Eduard Batlle IRB, Spain
Mathew Garnett Sanger Center, UK
Koen Oost FMI, Switzerland
Marisa Karow FAU, Germany
Marta Shahbazi LMB, Cambridge, UK
Alison Simmons University of Oxford, UK
Elly Tanaka IMP, Austria
Barbara Treutlein ETH Zürich, Switzerland
Andreas Trumpp DKFZ, Germany
Baptiste Libé-Philippot VIB-KU Leuven Center for Brain & Disease Research

*Keynote speaker

© Dr. Andrea Gamir-Morralla, UM, Institut für Physiologische Chemie